Canon’s new batteries, the LP-E6, are fantastic. I remember that in the “good old days” we didn’t have a battery and had to advance the film by pushing the film advance lever with the thumb. For some cameras we had to advance the lever a couple of times, the frame rate was 3 photos every 5 seconds. Very few cameras even had the option of a motor drive. The motor drives usually had 6 or 8 AA batteries. In the 90s almost all new cameras started to have a motor drive.

Now with digital, there’s no film to advance but everything else uses the battery, from the light meter, the auto-focus, the IS to the CPUs… They last forever, almost. I usually get around a thousand photos per charge, depending on if I use the pop-up flash as a commander unit or not. Usually when the battery is down in the 20% range is when I change the battery. You have a second spare battery? Right?

The Canon LP-E6 battery is a lithium-ion battery. It keeps a flat curve of electricity delivery until the voltage drops very quickly toward the end. Meaning that when the battery is low, you can’t get accurate focus, IS

So how do you change the battery?

Open the door at the bottom and remove the latch and it comes off. Duh! Wrong!

  1. Turn off the camera
  2. Look at the orange LED at the bottom right.

    • Does it light up? Then wait until it’s finished.
    • Doesn’t light up? Then you are OK.
    • Now remove the battery

So why turn off the camera before removing the battery? Because and it’s a very big because. Nobody knows when the computer camera writes the photos to the flash card. The computer camera writes the photos to the flash card in its spare time. That’s why most of the memory cards get corrupted.

But I’ve done it for years and never had a problem.” It’s the same as wearing a seat belt. Your chance of having a car accident today are infinitesimal but if you have an accident, the seat belt will save your life. It’s the same with turning off the camera before changing the battery.